Three-Martini Lunch by Suzanne Rindell

Title: Three-Martini Lunch

Author: Suzanne Rindell

Pub Date: 2016

My Rating: ★★★★★

View on Goodreads | Buy on Book Depository | Wordery


‘Back in those days My Old Man was king of what they called the three-martini lunch. This meant that in dimly lit steakhouses all over Manhattan my father made bold, impetuous deals over gin and oysters. That was how it was done.’
New York, 1958. Three young adults desperate to make their mark on the world of publishing – their choices, betrayals and passions will draw them together and change their lives for ever. Cliff Nelson, the privileged son of a New York publisher, is slumming it around Greenwich Village, enjoying booze, drugs and the idea that he’s the next Jack Kerouac. Fresh-faced Eden Katz arrives in the city with one burning ambition, but she is shocked at the stumbling blocks she encounters. Miles Tillman, a publisher’s messenger boy, is an aspiring writer who straddles various worlds and belongs to none.

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TOP TEN TUESDAY: Things Books Have Made Me Want To Do or Learn About After Reading Them

This weekly meme was created by The Broke and the Bookish. Today’s theme is Top Ten Things Books Have Made Me Want To Do or Learn About After Reading Them.


The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone
by Olivia Laing

Nonfiction | Memoir | Art | New York

MADE ME: want to learn more about artists mentioned in it like Edward Hopper, Andy Warhol, and David Wojnarowicz
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Pub Date: March 1st, 2016

My Rating: ★★★★★

Goodreads | Buy: Amazon.co.uk  | Amazon.com | Book Depository

Humane, provocative and deeply moving, The Lonely City is about the spaces between people and the things that draw them together, about sexuality, mortality and the magical possibilities of art. It’s a celebration of a strange and lovely state, adrift from the larger continent of human experience, but intrinsic to the very act of being alive.

This is such an amazing book! I loved this! It made me feel understood, it made me feel. Very often I had to stop, reread some passage that especially got to me and think about it. And there were many such moments.

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The Muse by Jessie Burton

Title: The Muse

Author:  Jessie Burton

Pub Date: June 30th, 2016

Honors: 

My Rating: ★★★★☆

View on Goodreads | Buy on  UK Amazon | US Amazon | Book Depository | Wordery


 The Muse is a fantastic read with well-plotted twists. Odelle Bastien comes to London from Trinidad looking for better life, more chances for success. She’s hired by mysterious Majorie Quick to work as a typist in Skelton Institue. Odelle is a writer, and one of her poems is a starting point of her relationship with Lawrie Scott. Lawrie is an owner of a painting that as it turns out was painted by a very promising Spanish author that we don’t know much about. Lawrie brings the painting to the Skelton for examination – an event that shakes Quick and excites gallery’s owner. All this is happening in 1960s London. In parallel to how we follow Odelle’s steps to finding out what is Quick’s connection to the painting, we are taken back to 1930s Spain when the painting depicting Saint Rufina was created. It was painted in an uncertain time in Europe but in a somewhat happy time for the artist. Olive Schloss moved to small rural town Arazuelo with her parents, and there she meets Isaac and Teresa Robles. Isaac is a socialist that is passionate about helping workers; Teresa is his half-sister who is hired as a help in Schloss’s house. Robles change Schloss lives in many ways, leaving us wondering how the painting ended up in London thirty yeats later.

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