Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

81hch97ggglTitle: Code Name Verity

Author: Elizabeth Wein

Pub Date: February 6th, 2012

Format: Audiobook

Honors:    

My Rating: ★★★☆☆

View on Goodreads | Buy on  amazon.co.uk |amazon.com | Book Depository


Captured British agent is held in France, tortured and forced to disclose the code she must know as a wireless operator. She has a deal with the Gestapo that got her two weeks to write down her account of British war effort that may be useful for Nazis. She is writing her story through the eyes of her friend Maggie. This was a bit irritating for me at points, especially the scene where she wrote of how Maggie met her. Maggie was the pilot that brought her to France, and who she believes is now dead after the plane crashed. The written accounts describe in detail how Maggie got her license and how she was working as a female pilot. There are also bits of the present events of being kept in prison. Those parts have a wit to them, but they don’t disclose how horrible the situation was for the Verity. And even the parts where she talks about being physically and forcefully restrained do little for me, they didn’t move me really. I didn’t care much for Verity throughout her story.

I am not sure what to think of the story – it was interesting at the end when we finally find out the truth. The second part of the book was more interesting than the first. After finishing the audiobook I rated the book four stars, I don’t know why I did that. Maybe that was some shock; some need to like this book because the idea is great, and reading about females engaged in the war effort is something I’d like to read more about in history books. When I started writing the review, I had to lower the rating because I didn’t like this book that much. I think that I liked that the end was finally a bit more eventful, and the reveal of the true meaning of the first part of the book made me think that this book was better. Now when I consider the whole story – it didn’t catch my attention, it was nice to listen to the audiobook because the narrators had lovely voices, but I often lost my focus.


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15 thoughts on “Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

  1. Georgiana Darcy says:

    I love the premise of this book and I wanted to read it for a while but I know I’m gonna get awfully bored if there isn’t enough drama to hold my attention. Seems like there isn’t.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. kimmiegg says:

    I really wanted to read this book, but when it came to buying I could only remember “Verity” so I accidentally downloaded a kindle version of another book… >.< I always have to remember to fact check and such before randomly, and impulsively buying… It’s too bad that the book in it’s entirety didn’t catch your attention… Was it just too much boring exposition?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ola says:

      Did you read the ‘Verity’? How was it? I remember reading that when Girl in a train came out and everyone was talking about it, a lot of people didn’t check the author and ended up buying book under the same title but by different author. And actually they weren’t that disappointed 😉
      Code name Verity had just too much descriptions of events that at the end didn’t bring much to the strony beside showing the friendship between Quinny and Maggie, and too much about planes without much action or drama. All very nice stories but how much can I listen to that?

      Liked by 1 person

      • kimmiegg says:

        I haven’t started yet! I just did this huge haul of ebooks. I totally understand… Too much description and exposition, and not enough action to keep the book going.. There always has to be a nice balance there.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Lauren Busser says:

    I am sorry you didn’t enjoy this book as much. I did appreciate the turn that the book took towards the end and that’s probably why I love it. It exists as a whole, and while the first part may move a little more slowly I thought they complimented each other nicely.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ola says:

      I totally can see how this book can be loved by some people, and I can see myself actually recommending it to people I thing might enjoy it. But it wasn’t a story for me to love.

      Like

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