In Twenty Years by Allison Win Scotch book cover

REVIEW: In Twenty Years by Allison Winn Scotch

9781503935242_86a53Title: In Twenty Years

Author: Allison Winn Scotch

Pub Date: July 1st, 2016

Rating: ★★★☆☆

See on Goodreads


You might want to pretend you can reinvent yourself; you might want to give yourself that chance to wash it away into blank pace, but you can’t. The past doesn’t change. That history doesn’t change. You don’t change unless you swim so hard upstream that you’re lucky not to exhaust yourself into drowning. It’s no surprise that no one else changes neither. […]
The past is who you are. The future is what you do with that.

This is a reunion story. First, we meet a group of six friends on the last day of their college life – Bea, a leader of the group, is making them all to write up a letter to older self, a letter that they will read again in 20 years. Then we fast forward almost two decades from that day. Now everything is completely different than the life of twenty-something college students that thought that everything is possible and that they will be friends, a family forever.

In twenty years from the day – Bea is no longer with them; she died in a car accident. Lindy is a rock star. Catharine is a domestic goddess with her own blog empire. Owen is a stay-at-home dad. Colin is a Boob King of L.A and Annie is a stay at home mum with a social media obsession to make her life ‘more’ than it is. Catharine and Owen are not so happily married, Lindy and Annie do not talk to each other after some major drama at Catherine and Owen’s wedding. Colin settled for plastic surgery instead of neurosurgery. At July 4th weekend they are reunited in their old home when once they all lived together and wrote letters to older selves.

This book tells a story of life. It nicely shows how we might hope are life will evolve, and how we are at one point in our life faced with a realisation that something went wrong, that at one point you lost yourself from the past, and now you cannot longer recognise yourself. It is a lovely story, with a lot of drama that is showing the central premise of the book – a reunion – in a pleasant and entertaining way with a sweet, hopeful ending. It was a superb read that is perfect for boiling days when it is just too hot to read anything heavier; when reading about somebody else’s lives, and dramas are just the right amount of effort you are capable of doing on such day.

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