The Wangs vs. the World by Jade Chang book cover

The Wangs vs. the World by Jade Chang

9780544734098_aaf79Title: The Wangs vs. the World

Author: Jade Chang

Pub Date: October 4th, 2016

Rating: ★★★☆☆

More on Goodreads.


I thought I would really like this book. The blurb made the story sound so promising. It was supposed to be some hilarious novel, ‘hysterically funny from the first page’. I have a different sense of humour than guys at the book’s publishing house. It was ok, the humour in it was a bit embarrassing, not funny. The story was a bit too ‘jumpy’ for me, a lot was happening and the plot line was a bit blurry. And there is a lot of events packed into the story which are not necessary needed to be in the book… It just didn’t hold together very well.

It is a story of Wang family, a story of immigrants, of riches to rags. Charles Wang came to America and lived his American dream. He becomes a wealthy man building a cosmetic empire, married a pretty model and had three children. Charles remarried later, to Barbra (also immigrant, she named herself after Barbra Streisand), when his first wife died in a helicopter accident that he survived. Now he has to face bankruptcy. His whole cosmetic empire is being repossessed, and he has nothing left. So he packs his family and embarks on a road trip across the States to upstate New York where his oldest daughter is living. All this time he has the plan to come back to China and reclaim his ancestor land that was taken from them by Communists.

Continue reading

In Twenty Years by Allison Win Scotch book cover

REVIEW: In Twenty Years by Allison Winn Scotch

9781503935242_86a53Title: In Twenty Years

Author: Allison Winn Scotch

Pub Date: July 1st, 2016

Rating: ★★★☆☆

See on Goodreads


You might want to pretend you can reinvent yourself; you might want to give yourself that chance to wash it away into blank pace, but you can’t. The past doesn’t change. That history doesn’t change. You don’t change unless you swim so hard upstream that you’re lucky not to exhaust yourself into drowning. It’s no surprise that no one else changes neither. […]
The past is who you are. The future is what you do with that.

This is a reunion story. First, we meet a group of six friends on the last day of their college life – Bea, a leader of the group, is making them all to write up a letter to older self, a letter that they will read again in 20 years. Then we fast forward almost two decades from that day. Now everything is completely different than the life of twenty-something college students that thought that everything is possible and that they will be friends, a family forever.

Continue reading